Yvon Dandurand, Criminology and Criminal Justice Associate Professor writes UNODC Manual

Congratulations to Yvon Dandurand, Professor Emeritus Criminology and Criminal Justice, UFV and recent UFV graduate Jessica Jahn, who recently wrote the “UNODC Manual on the Prevention of Child Recruitment and Exploitation by Terrorist and Violent Extremist Groups: The Role of the Justice System”. The manual was also released during the Annual Session in Vienna of the United Nations Commission on Crime prevention and Criminal Justice.

Lieutenant Governor’s medal: Leanne Julian an advocate for Indigenous inclusivity

As Leanne Julian stood outside as part of a group of geography students listening to Mt. Lehman community members explain how they wanted to present their community it to the world, she could literally see her father’s home community, the Matsqui First Nation, not far in the distance.

But nobody else seemed to notice.

Leanne was taking part in a planning course taught by Cherie Enns, where students were working with the Mt. Lehman community on strategies to promote this rural corner of Abbotsford.

“In all the talk about their community vision they did not mention what their relation was to the surrounding First Nations communities, even though I knew they were situated in the traditional territory of the Matsqui people.”

Leanne gently challenged them on that, which led to her organizing a town hall dinner that brought together members of the Matsqui First Nation and the Mount Lehman community.

“The impact of that session was significant,” noted professor Enns. “Since then Leanne has been both an ambassador and a light in every setting where I have observed her. The light she shines might not always be comfortable, but by her presence, commitment to truth, and knowledge she is paying a key role in Indigenization at UFV and helping me to decolonize my curriculum.”

**To read more, go to the UFV Today’s website**

**Ad sources from by Anne Russell on June 4, 2019**

Matthew Harty awarded Governor General’s Gold Medal with perfect GPA

Early on in his career at the Vancouver Police Department (VPD), an aspiring Matthew Harty would occasionally help in street-level undercover work during a patrol shift.

“I was quite young, so I was always a student, that was my story,” he says remembering the start of his police career.

He would give the buy money to a drug dealer, and then the signal to his colleagues when it was time to move in.

Now an Inspector with the VPD, the 42-year-old Harty recently revisited his student plain-clothes role — this time actually enrolling in and completing the University of the Fraser Valley’s MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice.

The buzz of the bust was replaced with the reward of completing each A+ assignment along his path to a perfect 4.33 GPA graduation.

That persistence led Harty to receive this year’s 2019 Governor General’s Gold Medal, which is presented to the graduate who achieves the highest standing at the graduate degree level.

“Everyone worked so hard in my cohort and in the school, so I’m very thankful, humbled, and honoured,” he says. “If everyone is competing as best they can against themselves they should all feel proud.”

**To read more, go to the UFV Today’s website**

**Ad sources from by Greg Laychak on June 5, 2019**

The world is a classroom for Global Development Studies major Sterling Ray


UFV is committed to helping students and alumni make an impact locally and beyond. Sterling Ray is a Bachelor of Arts student who has taken that challenge literally.

Ray is leading intercultural initiatives both on campus and abroad, and will be graduating in June 2019 with a Global Development Studies major and an extended minor in Latin American studies.

Ray expresses that she enjoyed the interdisciplinary studies that are offered in the Global Development Studies program.

“I took one elective on human rights in Latin American Studies and was hooked.”

Her specialization in global development and interest in Spanish classes turned out to be the perfect fit during her internship last summer in Oaxaca, Mexico with the International Assembly on Community Development.

Ray’s internship gave her the opportunity to participate in round tables and thematic discussions that addressed Indigenous knowledge, stories of resistance, and identity construction. Ray was one of the principal organizers.

“It was a unique learning experience to be in a place where Indigenous knowledge and voices are shared in an assembly based on ancient traditions of Indigenous governance.”

She also conducted qualitative interviews with the presenters in English and Spanish, learning about language and identity, and building networks to strengthen Indigenous communities.

Ray is also involved at UFV as the student representative on the Global Development Studies program committee and leads the Global Development Students Club.

“The goal of the GDS club is to build the student community, network, and apply what we are learning to create events and opportunities for global engagement.”

The GDS club is open for all UFV students interested in global development.

An upcoming initiative of the GDS club, partnered with the MCC Indigenous Relations program, is the KAIROS Blanket Exercise, to be held at UFV on May 16.

“This is an opportunity for the community to participate in an interactive learning experience, led by an elder, that teaches Canadian Indigenous history as a step towards reconciliation,” notes Ray, adding that these types of experiences will also help students become more aware of the Indigenous resources on campus, such as the Indigenous Student Centre.

What’s next for Ray after graduation? With a passion for learning she is ready for the next challenge and is interested in pursuing higher education. She is also excited to continue her two research projects on Indigenous media, and refugee claimants.

As for advice for undergraduate students, Ray urges them to get involved.

“Students should enhance their university experiences by learning new languages, and getting involved in research projects, internships and clubs to create change and make an impact both locally and globally.”

To learn more and register for the KAIROS Blanket Exercise on Thursday, May 16 from 6-8 pm contact gdsc.ufv@gmail.com

Interested in joining the GDS club? Connect through the GDSC: Global Development Studies Club on Facebook page to learn more

Criminal Justice Students at the United Nations and Western Society of Criminology

Recently Amanda McCormick, UFV Criminology and Criminal Justice Director, travelled to New York with BA (Criminal Justice) student Lauren Kempers and Master of Arts (Criminal Justice) student Caleigh West to present at the United Nations 63rd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women.

Amanda and the students presented their research project on increasing women’s access to civil protective orders in domestic violence. They gained valuable feedback from the event organizers, the International Police Executive Symposium (IPES) and the Women’s United Nations Resource Network. Subsequently they were also invited to attend and present at the IPES session in Belgrade this summer 2019.

During their trip, they also met with a colleague from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice who gave them a tour of the campus and the opportunity to present in a Master’s class as guest lecturers on the Canadian Criminal Justice System, which generated a lot of interest and discussion.

Additionally, four UFV graduate students and one undergraduate student went to the recent Western Society of Criminology conference in Honolulu where they delivered compelling presentations.

John Belec awarded the 2019 J. Alistair McVey Award for Teaching Excellence

Congratulations to John Belec, UFV Associate Professor in the Geography and Environment department. John was recently awarded the 2019 J. Alistair McVey Award for Teaching Excellence by the Canadian Association of Geographers.

“The purpose of the J. Alistair McVey Award for Teaching Excellence is to recognize a geography instructor known for the quality of their teaching. This is in recognition of the central importance of teaching excellence in geographic education. The recipient is intended to be a teacher in a university, college or secondary school in BC or Alberta. This award is named after Alistair McVey, a well-known and highly-respected geography instructor in the BC college system for more than 35 years” (CAG).

John Belec’s research specialities are focused on the study of urban housing markets, urban residential design and cross border regions. In 2013-2014, John embarked on a research endeavour that involved the study of Abbotsford’s ethnic enclave known as the Townline neighbourhood.[i]

Image: John Belec receiving the 2019 J. Alistair McVey Award for Teaching Excellence

Read more about John Belec’s research, and the Geography and Environment courses he teaches at UFV. https://www.ufv.ca/geography/faculty-and-staff/faculty-members/belec-john.htm

WD, Western Division, Canadian Association of Geographers. (2019). Awards Presented by the Western Division of the Canadian Association of Geographers. Retrieved from http://www.geog.uvic.ca/wcag/awards.html

[i]University of the Fraser Valley. (2019). Faculty Members – John Belec. Retrieved from https://www.ufv.ca/geography/faculty-and-staff/faculty-members/belec-john.htm

Photos courtesy of John Belec.

 

 

North Korea’s Current Economic Situation and Global Peace Workshop

The UFV College of Arts and the Department of Economics recently held a workshop on “North Korea’s Current Economic Situation and Global Peace”, moderated and organized by Dr. Bosu Seo.

The workshop aimed to inform Canadian mainstream society about North Korea’s fluctuating economic situation and its impact on countries around the world, including
South Korea, USA, China, Japan, and Canada. The guest speakers included Dr. Yvon Dandurand (Professor Emeritus, UFV Criminology & Criminal Justice and Ex-United Nations Office Drug and Crime Lead consultant) and Mr. Shin, Tae-Young (Representative, The National Unification Advisory Council Vancouver Chapter).

The panel members included Ms. Yoo Soon Oh (Chair, Vancouver Korean-Canadian Scholarship Foundation), Dr. Michael Maschek (Economics, UFV), Dr. Edward Akuffo (Political science, UFV) and Dr. Steven Schroeder (Chair in the Peace and Conflict Studies program, UFV). The opening speech was initiated by Dr. Jacqueline Nolte, Dean of Arts, UFV.

The guest speakers and panel members discussed how countries such as South Korea, USA, China, Japan, and Canada can contribute to the peaceful settlement of the Korean Peninsula and peace in the world by drawing attention to the successful completion of the denuclearization talks on the Korean peninsula, and economic development plans of North Korea.

Audience members and guest speakers in the photo include: Dr. Edward Akuffo, Mr. Tae-Young Shin, Dr. Bosu Seo, Dr. Jacqueline Nolte, Dr. Yvon Dandurand, Ms. Yoo Soon Oh.

Mapping Ancient Flood Deposits in the Langley Bog: A Student Research Program

Dr. Jonathan Hughes, UFV Associate Professor, Geography and the Environment, 2018 

“When I first got to UFV in 2006, retiring professor, Don Tunstall, had left this box of Kodachromes on my desk,” says UFV associate professor Dr. Jonathan Hughes, a bio-geographer and paleoecologist in the department of Geography and the Environment.

First used in the 1930s, a Kodachrome is a 35 mm slide used for professional colour photography. “I started looking through them thinking these are kind of interesting” says Hughes. Hughes discovered that the Kodachrome slides had originally come from a local farmer during the 1948 flood, who had recorded images and field notes of damaged properties in the Matsqui and Hatzic areas.

Having a paleoecological interest (the study of interactions between organisms and/or organisms and their environments) and having studied the evidence of ancient earthquakes, the idea of ancient floods appealed to Hughes. “I thought there should be a sediment signature here, so I contacted Metro Vancouver Parks” says Hughes.

Hughes has since been developing a research program in conjunction with Metro Vancouver Parks and, with the help of his students, has begun to map ancient flood deposits preserved in the Langley Bog, which contain approximately 5000 years of flood history. “There would be more records except there’s been lots of loss of wetland habitat through development, hence the need to restore” says Hughes.

“I take students in there with the intent to collect data that would be informative to the managers associated with Metro Vancouver Parks” he says. Third and fourth year students enrolled in Hughes’ soils, wetlands and paleoecology courses are given the opportunity to carry out field work at Sumas Mountain and Derby Reach Regional Park. There, the students collect, compare and share data from different sites, bring the data back to the lab for processing and write individual reports.

“The students really like it because it’s tangible” says Hughes. Last winter, Hughes received a request from Metro Vancouver Parks to develop a restoration plan for the bog. Students were able to use the data they collected, along with case studies, to write a recommendation on what tools to use during their restoration efforts.

Hughes courses are applicable, local and provide community outreach for students. Many of Hughes students have gone on to work with government agencies (including Metro Vancouver Parks, the Fraser Valley Regional District and the Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition), environmental consulting companies, and not-for-profits, as well, many students have been accepted into graduate programs.

To watch Dr. Jonathan Hughes’ short video interview, click on the link: [Jonathan Hughes short video]

 

To watch Dr. Jonathan Hughes’ full video interview, click on the link: [Jonathan Hughes full video interview]

Minister of Multiculturalism, Official Languages and La Francophonie for a Weekend

Raymond Kobes, BA, French Major & Business Minor, 2018 

“I went to Victoria for University Model Parliament” says Raymond Kobes. It was there in January 2018, that the UFV French alumnus and member of Universities Model Parliament was selected to be the Minister of Multiculturalism, Official Languages and La Francophonie for a weekend.

“Basically when you go to Model Parliament, it’s as if Ottawa was postponed and you were actually in Ottawa as the official representatives and members of parliament” says Kobes. Over the course of the weekend, Kobes was responsible for three portfolios: Multiculturalism, Official Languages and the French culture.

In this role, Kobes was expected to field questions by the opposition regarding certain bills that related to his area. “It was really neat because there were so many different opinions and different world views… but when it came down to it, we were all there for a common goal of learning how to get involved in the political world and how we can best make a better Canada” he says.

To be an effective member of parliament, Kobes recommends becoming a good orator because a large part of the job will include giving speeches and asking or responding to questions from either side of the House of Commons. He also recommends becoming bilingual. “The best part about [being a Minister] was that I got to use my French in the House… and got to share with other people why those things are important” says Kobes.

Growing up in Abbotsford, Kobes was drawn to politics at an early age and dreamed of one day becoming a member of parliament. “I look forward to my future in politics, hopefully, as a member of parliament in the future and a lot of that has to do with my education here at the University of the Fraser Valley” says Kobes.

Kobes graduated this June 2018 from UFV. He is set to teach French for one year at Credo Christian High School in Langley starting September 2018, and then plans to become heavily involved in the Canadian federal election in 2019.

To watch Raymond’s short video interview, click on the link: https://bit.ly/2NloL72

To watch Raymond’s full video interview, click on the link: https://bit.ly/2mr2vx2

Eyém Sqwà:l – UFV’s Literary Café at the Harrison Festival of the Arts

Eyém Sqwà:l = Strong Words @ the Harrison Festival of the Arts

Date: Monday, July 9 at 8:30pm 2018
Location: Memorial Hall

Tickets: Adult $28.00 ($25 til June 22nd)      Student/Senior $25.00 ( $23 til June 22nd)

UFV’s Literary Café at the Harrison Festival of the Arts offers an intimate opportunity to get up close and personal with some of the West Coast’s brightest writers and poets.

This year’s theme Eyém Sqwà:l : Strong Words, celebrates the voices of two powerful Stó:lō multi-media artists and their oral, performance-based style, along with world-renowned spoken word artist, Shane Koyczan who has been called the “poet of our generation.”

KELIYA

Keliya is a poet, screenwriter, filmmaker and hip hop artist from the Stó:lō Nation. She is also a graduate from the UBC Film Studies Bachelor of Arts program and aims to tell stories about her people that are not only modern and traditional, but also from an Aboriginal perspective.

Keliya has travelled across Canada and the US performing for communities and youth. These are the people for whom she makes her art and she is passionate about spreading messages of empowerment and love in this way.

OSTWELVE

Ronnie Dean Harris aka Ostwelve is a Stó:lō /St’át’imc/Nlaka’pamux multimedia artist based in Vancouver, BC. He has worked as an actor and composer on the APTN/Showcase TV series, Moccasin Flats, toured internationally as a hip-hop performer, been a director, programmer and producer for the Vancouver Indigenous Media Arts Festival and is now the Program Director for “Reframing Relations.” This Community Arts Council of Vancouver initiative allows Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists to interface with students and youth in schools and communities around the concept of reconciliation. Check out his website @ www.ronniedeanharris.com

SHANE KOYCZAN

Shane Koyczan is an extraordinary talent who has blown the dust off the traditional designation “poet.” He is a writer and multi-media spoken word artist whose work has appeared in print, viral videos, opera and his own furiously-honest, award-winning performances. His first published collection, Visiting Hours, was the only work of poetry selected by both the Guardian and the Globe and Mail for their Best Books of the Year lists in 2005. Koyczan followed up on that success with Stickboy, a novel in verse that chronicled the dark journey of a bullied child. From these words of helpless rage, he was asked to produce the libretto for a full operatic produced by Vancouver Opera in 2014.

Our Deathbeds Will be Thirsty was released in 2012. The book features the piece, “To This Day,” a poem about bullying that went viral on Youtube, receiving over a million views in a matter of days. Most recently Koyczan embarked on a journey to discover his own origin story. One result is the documentary, Shut Up and Say Something, in which he meets his father for the first time. For more information check out: shanekoyczan.com