Helping high school students navigate racial identity

Helping high school students navigate racial identity

 

Anecia Gill, Sociology BA 2017

By creating an anti-racism mentorship workshop that she intends to deliver at Abbotsford high schools this fall, Anecia Gill was able to combine her passions for social theory and her hometown.

Gill’s family has lived in Abbotsford for over 100 years and she feels a strong connection to this place. She is also drawn to sociology thanks to her mother, who took a degree in the same field and had all of her old textbooks on the family bookshelf. Gill completed her own Bachelor of Arts in Sociology at UFV this spring and in her final year she created the workshop in a directed study with Dr. Katherine Watson.

Inspired by critical race theory (DuBois, Fanon), which outlines the complexities of non-white racial identity, she wanted to help young people in Abbotsford navigate this complicated terrain.

“The root of this is the racism they face,” she says. “I’m hoping that I can help explain . . . and legitimize their experiences so that they can better understand themselves and how they fit within society.” Gill notes that when people have theoretical knowledge and vocabulary, they can better articulate their experiences and advocate for themselves within their communities.

Schools, she says, have had a long history acting as gatekeepers for legitimate knowledge, so offering an after-school workshop that attempts to critique power structures seemed like the ideal place. Her intention is for the program to help decolonize and validate non-white identity by legitimizing and supporting the lived realities of non-white students, in particular, Indo-Canadian youth, whom the program targets.

She admits that she can’t teach high school students the ins and outs of critical race theory in five days, but she wants to spark their interest. And in doing so, she hopes to give youth some helpful tools to understand and negotiate their racial identity.

For a taste of what students will learn, check out Gill’s course outline:

Day one: Cultural hegemony and power knowledge – Gramsci and Foucault

Day two: Critical Race Theory – Du Bois and Fanon

Day three: Brown experiences of racism – Said

Day four: Intersectionality of race and gender: a critique of imperialist feminism

Day five: Wrap-up discussion

GENERAL STUDIES MINI FAIR

Designed to address student needs within the program, this mini-fair will cover the following topics:

  • Diploma Drop-In: 2-3:30pm
  • GPA Booster Workshop: 3-3:30pm
  • So you want to be a teacher? 3:30-4:30pm
  • Degree Drop-In: 4:30-6pm

WHEN: Monday, May 14
TIME: 2-6PM
LOCATION: D217, Abbotsford Campus

OPEN TO EVERYONE! Come learn about customized learning plans, speak with an advisor, or learn how to calculate your GPA.

Click on the event link to learn more!

UFV History Instructor, Dr. Ian Rocksborough-Smith, featured at Illinois Press Book Exhibit

Dr. Rocksborough-Smith, a sessional faculty member in UFV’s History department, holds his newly published book Black Public History in Chicago at the University of Illinois Press book exhibit on April 12, 2018.

What did you do?

“This is my first book. It represents nearly ten years of archival and oral history research from my PhD studies through my early years as a history instructor at UFV (2013-present). It focuses on how black Americans, many of them school teachers in Chicago, used public history projects to engage with struggles for civil rights and citizenship over the middle decades of the 20th Century. These projects included things like curriculum reforms for public schools, local history organizations and societies, and efforts to build museums and institutions, like the DuSable Museum of African American History – which is alive and well today. For my research, I was very fortunate to interview the now deceased founder of the DuSable Museum, Dr. Margaret T.G. Burroughs, who is considered an artistic and cultural icon of 20th Century Chicago and especially its African American community. I am thankful for all the support I received from UFV History Department colleagues and associates over the years as well as colleagues at St. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, where I have also taught.”

What’s next?

“My primary research interests include the study of late 19th and 20th Century United States history, urban studies, and histories of race, religion, and empire in the Atlantic world. In particular, my future work will continue to look at how local and public history methods can help to uncover these aspects of the past, particularly in cities like Chicago which became almost “laboratories” for how the “modern” North American city evolved. Currently, I am working on a new project about how white Catholic liberals engaged in anti-racism in the 1950s in northern U.S. cities like Chicago. Indeed, many North American cities became the site of successive immigration of Catholic Europeans over the early decades of the 20th Century and I am fascinated with how these groups on the one hand experienced discrimination themselves but came to in turn discriminate against black Americans and other people of color who moved to the city.”

“I am excited to be returning to teach as a LTA history instructor with UFV. In the courses I have been privileged to teach here, I have learned a lot from my students who are deeply engaged in local issues in the Fraser Valley community as well as global issues of significance, such as the forces that have given rise historically to developments like Brexit or the current presidency of Donald Trump. I’m particularly excited to be teaching a new course on Populism in America (History 396Q), which looks at the ways populism has informed American political culture from the administration of Andrew Jackson through the present.”

Dr. Rocksborough-Smith sits on a panel at the Organization of American Historians in Sacramento.

INTERPRET CREATIVE & PERFORMING ARTS FESTIVAL

Creative & Performing Arts Festival

Date: Friday, April 27
Time: 6pm – 10:30pm
Location: Evered Hall, Student Union Building

This first-time event will celebrate the arts at UFV featuring Theatre, Creative Writing and Visual Arts. The following individuals, including alumni, will showcase their diverse talents on April 27, 2018:

Margret Bollerup
Bethany Caldwell
Paige Caldwell
Sidi Chen
Julia Dovey
Emily Eggert-Botkin
Cat Friesen
Mitch Huttema
Jessica Karroll
Jesse Klassen
Luke Kokoszska
Abrianna Leaming
Wenwei Liu
Cameron McKerchar
Willow Mussell
Emilie Poirier
Deanne Ratzlaff
Deb Silver
Krystina Spracklin
Christopher Taylor

Readings and performances by UFV Creative Writing and THEA Directing 451 students. Selected artworks from the University Arts Collection will also be on display in addition to works produced by the following courses: IDS400: Decolonizing Canada’s 150th, VA 232 Sculpture & Extended Media II, VA 252 Print Media II, VA 160 Video Production I & VA 261 Video Production II.

Opening Reception: 6:00 PM @ Evered Hall, Student Union Building, 33844 King Rd Abbotsford.

The art exhibition will run until May 11, 2018.

Event locations include the S’eliyemetaxwtexw Art Gallery (B136), D and C buildings.

Catered by Restaurant 62. Live music from 9-10:30 PM! Performers include Kristin Witko, Myriad of Whispers and DJ Simon Bridgefoot.

Event is free and everyone is welcome!

Sponsored by SUS, UFV, CIVL Radio, Restaurant 62, & Ravens Brewing Company

 

CELEBRATE INSPIRATION – AND DISCOVER YOUR MUSE

The 2018 Graphic and Digital Design grads are rooted in the inspiration around them — from little details and large patterns, to where they live, who they are, and aspire to be. They have discovered new terrain and uncovered unique ideas. It’s time to celebrate inspiration with them and find your muse.

The University of the Fraser Valley, Graphic + Digital Design Portfolio Show:
an exhibition of communication design, brand identity, dynamic media and interactive design

Reception: TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2018 | 4 – 7 pm
Exhibition: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25 | 9 – 6 pm

HIGHSTREET, ABBOTSFORD
J150 – 3122 MOUNT LEHMAN RD.

UFVGDD.COM

Join our Facebook Event

Stefan featured at NYC’s Infinite Archive: NYPL art exhibit

Shelley Stefan’s work will be housed in a vintage card catalog at the upcoming Infinite Archive: NYPL art exhibition in New York City.

What will she do?

Visual Arts associate professor Shelley Stefan is set to be featured as a guest artist in the upcoming Infinite Archive: NYPL art exhibition in New York City from April 5 to September 3, 2018. The exhibition will introduce a diverse group of 30 artists, each responding to a book, poem, periodical or other archival material from The New York Public Library’s vast collection.

Artworks included span across a wide spectrum of media ranging from:

  • Paintings
  • Printmaking
  • Photography
  • Assemblage
  • Sculpture

Each artwork presents a complex dialogue between the artist and the selected text and will be housed in a vintage card catalog. Visitors will be encouraged to discover a variety of artworks as they open each drawer. Many artworks will include interactive elements, such as solving a puzzle, exploring a maze or unfolding an abstract painting. To see pictures and learn more, visit: https://www.infinitearchive.art/infinite-archive-nypl/

What’s Next?

You can find Stefan in her art studio working on a new series of figure paintings based on her time in Bologna, Italy. This body of work will culminate her arts-based sabbatical research from Northern Italy.

Careers in Psychology and Counselling

Are you interested in becoming a counsellor? Then the Careers in Psychology and Counselling info session is for YOU!

When: Thursday, April 5, 2018 (1-3pm)
Where: Student Life Lounge (Student Union Building, Room S1111)
(*followed by refreshments)

Hosted by:

  • Psychology Department
  • Student Psychology Association (SPA)

Take a Course in 18 Days with UFV U-Cube!

Focus and fast track your education! During the 2018 Summer Semester, the College of Arts is offering the U-Cube program to all UFV students.

What is U-Cube? It is a Condensed University Block Experience at UFV.

This semester’s pilot program will allow students to take blocks of condensed courses in:

  • Theatre 101 (May Block: May 3-25)
  • English 108 (June Block: May 31-June 22)
  • History 102 (July Block: June 27-July 20)
  • Geography 130 (August Block: July 25-August 17)

Each course will run Monday to Friday (3 hours per day).

Space is limited, don’t miss out on this new summer opportunity! Sign-up today, visit: ufv.ca/arts/u-cube/