Ethics of Internships

On November 26, UFV held a panel discussion entitled Ethics of Internships. The event was hosted and organized by Dr. Cherie Enn’s (an Associate Geography Professor at UFV) Global Development Studies class (GDS 400).

The panel included both UFV students and internship hosts, those of whom held a range of differing views when it came to the complexities of international and domestic internships.

“Presenting at the Ethics of Internships event was a great way to reflect on our experiences and roles as GDS students and interns. Discussing the opportunities and challenges surrounding internships through a parody encouraged us to critically reflect on why GDS students do internships and how to ‘practice development’ in a positive way,” said Gina Dhinsa, a Global Development Studies student at UFV.

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Work Integrated Learning in the classroom: Q&A

Geography 331 students: Jessica Smith, Donovan Toews and Connor Fleming

On November 21, Jessica Smith, Donovan Toews and Connor Fleming took part in a student Question-and-Answer session about the Work Integrated Learning (WIL) component in Dr. Stefania Pizzirani’s Geography 331: Environmental Assessment and Management course.

Work Integrated Learning (WIL) is a process that combines theory and practice to prep students in both the academic and work setting. Each university or college uses its own terms to explain this type of learning. For instance, the College of Arts uses both WIL and experiential learning interchangeably.

Essentially, WIL allows students to more easily transition from school to work. Approximately, 65% to 70% of post-secondary students take part in some form of Work Integrated Learning during their studies. To learn more about Work Integrated Learning in the College of Arts, visit the website and/or contact our Practicum and Internship Coordinator: Elise.Goertz@ufv.ca.

Here’s what three geography students had to say:

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Students win 3rd prize at Singing Contest

On November 16, Hanna Młotkowska and Constance de Bruin from the Modern Languages Institute represented UFV Arts and won third prize in the final round of Chinese Bridge BC – Mandarin Singing Contest held at the UBC School of Music.

Student contestants (individuals/groups) from 9 universities and colleges in BC performed 22 shows in total. Only one spot was assigned to the first, second, and third prizes respectively.

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Working together to build peace

On October 29, students, staff, faculty and community members came together to discuss peacebuilding efforts locally and globally with area directors Cesar Flores and Lizzette Miranda from the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) in San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

“It’s very important to see faculty, students and people from the community interested in this big topic because there are realities that the world is facing,” said Flores.

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New School of Creative Arts has successfully launched

As of Friday, September 27, 2019, UFV College of Arts’ new School of Creative Arts (SoCA) has successfully launched.

The new cultural hub was featured in Academica Top Ten and The Abbotsford News. The school combines departments in theatre, visual arts, art history and media arts with the end goal of creating a centre for creative innovation in the Fraser Valley. Dr. Heather Davis-Fisch is the school’s new director. She was previously the department head for the theatre program from 2016-2019.

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Criminal Justice Students at the United Nations and Western Society of Criminology

Recently Amanda McCormick, UFV Criminology and Criminal Justice Director, travelled to New York with BA (Criminal Justice) student Lauren Kempers and Master of Arts (Criminal Justice) student Caleigh West to present at the United Nations 63rd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women.

Amanda and the students presented their research project on increasing women’s access to civil protective orders in domestic violence. They gained valuable feedback from the event organizers, the International Police Executive Symposium (IPES) and the Women’s United Nations Resource Network. Subsequently they were also invited to attend and present at the IPES session in Belgrade this summer 2019.

Read moreCriminal Justice Students at the United Nations and Western Society of Criminology

Mapping Ancient Flood Deposits in the Langley Bog: A Student Research Program

Jonathan Hughes

Dr. Jonathan Hughes, UFV Associate Professor, Geography and the Environment, 2018 

“When I first got to UFV in 2006, retiring professor, Don Tunstall, had left this box of Kodachromes on my desk,” says UFV associate professor Dr. Jonathan Hughes, a bio-geographer and paleoecologist in the department of Geography and the Environment.

First used in the 1930s, a Kodachrome is a 35 mm slide used for professional colour photography. “I started looking through them thinking these are kind of interesting” says Hughes. Hughes discovered that the Kodachrome slides had originally come from a local farmer during the 1948 flood, who had recorded images and field notes of damaged properties in the Matsqui and Hatzic areas.

Read moreMapping Ancient Flood Deposits in the Langley Bog: A Student Research Program

Minister of Multiculturalism, Official Languages and La Francophonie for a Weekend

Raymond Kobes, BA, French Major & Business Minor, 2018 

“I went to Victoria for University Model Parliament” says Raymond Kobes. It was there in January 2018, that the UFV French alumnus and member of Universities Model Parliament was selected to be the Minister of Multiculturalism, Official Languages and La Francophonie for a weekend.

“Basically when you go to Model Parliament, it’s as if Ottawa was postponed and you were actually in Ottawa as the official representatives and members of parliament” says Kobes. Over the course of the weekend, Kobes was responsible for three portfolios: Multiculturalism, Official Languages and the French culture.

In this role, Kobes was expected to field questions by the opposition regarding certain bills that related to his area. “It was really neat because there were so many different opinions and different world views… but when it came down to it, we were all there for a common goal of learning how to get involved in the political world and how we can best make a better Canada” he says.

To be an effective member of parliament, Kobes recommends becoming a good orator because a large part of the job will include giving speeches and asking or responding to questions from either side of the House of Commons. He also recommends becoming bilingual. “The best part about [being a Minister] was that I got to use my French in the House… and got to share with other people why those things are important” says Kobes.

Growing up in Abbotsford, Kobes was drawn to politics at an early age and dreamed of one day becoming a member of parliament. “I look forward to my future in politics, hopefully, as a member of parliament in the future and a lot of that has to do with my education here at the University of the Fraser Valley” says Kobes.

Kobes graduated this June 2018 from UFV. He is set to teach French for one year at Credo Christian High School in Langley starting September 2018, and then plans to become heavily involved in the Canadian federal election in 2019.

To watch Raymond’s short video interview, click on the link: https://bit.ly/2NloL72

To watch Raymond’s full video interview, click on the link: https://bit.ly/2mr2vx2

Helping high school students navigate racial identity

Helping high school students navigate racial identity

 

Anecia Gill, Sociology BA 2017

By creating an anti-racism mentorship workshop that she intends to deliver at Abbotsford high schools this fall, Anecia Gill was able to combine her passions for social theory and her hometown.

Gill’s family has lived in Abbotsford for over 100 years and she feels a strong connection to this place. She is also drawn to sociology thanks to her mother, who took a degree in the same field and had all of her old textbooks on the family bookshelf. Gill completed her own Bachelor of Arts in Sociology at UFV this spring and in her final year she created the workshop in a directed study with Dr. Katherine Watson.

Inspired by critical race theory (DuBois, Fanon), which outlines the complexities of non-white racial identity, she wanted to help young people in Abbotsford navigate this complicated terrain.

“The root of this is the racism they face,” she says. “I’m hoping that I can help explain . . . and legitimize their experiences so that they can better understand themselves and how they fit within society.” Gill notes that when people have theoretical knowledge and vocabulary, they can better articulate their experiences and advocate for themselves within their communities.

Schools, she says, have had a long history acting as gatekeepers for legitimate knowledge, so offering an after-school workshop that attempts to critique power structures seemed like the ideal place. Her intention is for the program to help decolonize and validate non-white identity by legitimizing and supporting the lived realities of non-white students, in particular, Indo-Canadian youth, whom the program targets.

She admits that she can’t teach high school students the ins and outs of critical race theory in five days, but she wants to spark their interest. And in doing so, she hopes to give youth some helpful tools to understand and negotiate their racial identity.

For a taste of what students will learn, check out Gill’s course outline:

Day one: Cultural hegemony and power knowledge – Gramsci and Foucault

Day two: Critical Race Theory – Du Bois and Fanon

Day three: Brown experiences of racism – Said

Day four: Intersectionality of race and gender: a critique of imperialist feminism

Day five: Wrap-up discussion