2019 GATE Convocation

Congratulations Graduates! The GATE faculty and staff were thrilled to watch you cross the stage at convocation. Thank you to each of you for choosing Geography as a program major/minor. It was a pleasure getting to know all of you and hope you keep in contact.

A special congratulations to Lauren on receiving the Canadian Association of Geographer’s Annual Scholarship as well as the Doug Nicol Annual Geography Department Scholarship!

A special congratulations to Shayla on receiving the American Association of Geographer’s Annual Scholarship!

 

Lieutenant Governor’s medal: Leanne Julian an advocate for Indigenous inclusivity

As Leanne Julian stood outside as part of a group of geography students listening to Mt. Lehman community members explain how they wanted to present their community it to the world, she could literally see her father’s home community, the Matsqui First Nation, not far in the distance.

But nobody else seemed to notice.

Leanne was taking part in a planning course taught by Cherie Enns, where students were working with the Mt. Lehman community on strategies to promote this rural corner of Abbotsford.

“In all the talk about their community vision they did not mention what their relation was to the surrounding First Nations communities, even though I knew they were situated in the traditional territory of the Matsqui people.”

Leanne gently challenged them on that, which led to her organizing a town hall dinner that brought together members of the Matsqui First Nation and the Mount Lehman community.

“The impact of that session was significant,” noted professor Enns. “Since then Leanne has been both an ambassador and a light in every setting where I have observed her. The light she shines might not always be comfortable, but by her presence, commitment to truth, and knowledge she is paying a key role in Indigenization at UFV and helping me to decolonize my curriculum.”

 

**To read more, go to the UFV Today’s website**

**Ad sources from by  on June 4, 2019**

GEOG 202 Field Trip

On March 1, 2019 Olav Lian, Carolyn Atkins, and Terah Sportel lead Geog 202 student on a two-day field trip into the BC Interior to study the landscape that had formed as a result of the last glaciation, and that which had been conditioned by its effect. The weather was sunny and clear, but extremely cold, as temperatures had dipped down to nearly -20 °C in Clinton by the morning of March 2. Olav Lian has been leading field trips into this region for more than 25 years, and this was by far the coldest one! Students were in good sprits and enjoyed learning about the landscape.

At Patterson Creek debris flow channel students enjoyed hearing traditional First Nations interpretations of the landscape from Geog 202 student, and Stó:lō Nation member, Leanne Julian.

Students navigate the steep and snowy slopes of Drynoch earthflow, near the community of Spenses Bridge.

View of the post-glacially terraced landscape in the Thompson River Valley, just west of Walhachin.

Students and faculty pose in front of the bed of ancient glacial Lake Thompson (beige coloured cliffs in the immediate foreground), Kamloops

Organics Sorting for Composting

Another CityStudio Project Underway: As part of their intervention strategy, GEOG/CMNS 257 students created and distributed an infographic on Organics Sorting for Composting in line with City of Abbotsford’s drive to increase composting participation in multi-family housing.

 

BC Agriculture and Climate Change Education Series

Registration is now open for the BC Agriculture and Climate Change Education Series!

The four-part Education Series is a joint endeavor with the BC Agricultural Climate Adaptation Research Network (ACARN) and the BC Ministry of Agriculture, and is hosted in collaboration with six education institutions across the province –UBC Vancouver & Okanagan; UNBC Prince George & Terrace; KPU Richmond; TRU Kamloops; NLC Fort St. John; UFV Abbotsford.

The goal of the Education Series is to provide university students (undergraduate and graduate), and new professionals, with an introduction to climate change adaptation in the BC agriculture sector and highlight related career opportunities

The Education Series will be broadcasted weekly to each satellite location from 6:30-8:30 pm, and will include a presentation and facilitated group activities that will provide participants with a local and provincial perspective on:

  • Module 1: Using Future Climate Projections (February 28th)
  • Module 2: Adaptation Concepts and Initiatives (March 7th)
  • Module 3: Collaborative Research for Producer Adaptation (March 14th)
  • Module 4: Extension for Climate-Smart Agriculture (March 21st)

Registration is free and will be open until February 13th. Follow this link to learn more about the event or click here to register today.

HUBBUB – GEOG 362: Geography of Tourism and Recreation

Class: Geog 362, Geography of Tourism and Recreation.

Collaboration with City Studio, which involved UFV experimental learning, City of Abbotsford staff liaisons as well as Tourism Abbotsford.

Challenge: the City of Abbotsford issued a challenge to the GEOG 362 class, to determine the tourism market and design a conceptual program of souvenir (s). The students were required to create the concepts, deliver term papers and presentations to the sponsors, and create posters for the HUBBUB event.

 

The 32 students worked in 6 teams to create a package of unique conceptual deliverables for the City/Tourism Abbotsford sponsors . Students from 3 of the groups and Instructor, Jen H., attended the City Studio HUBBUB event at City Hall on December 4th, and one of the groups  just narrowly missed winning the overall prize by 1 point, so they were given an honourable mention by the mayor. This group was called “Grow Abby”.

 

Click here to see the video.

 

UFV Approves the Creation of a New School of Science

The UFV Senate recently approved the formation of a School of Agriculture, Geography, and the Environment (SAGE) in the science department. The plan is to establish the new school by Sept. 1, 2019.

The agriculture department has not yet fully joined the new school of science, though they are associate members. According to Lucy Lee, dean of science, this is because the shift from a department to a school can be a slow process. Since the physical location of the agriculture department is in Chilliwack, more time will be needed to organize the logistics of the transition to a school of science.

To create the new school, the smaller units within the science department, agriculture, and possibly food sciences, will merge into a larger group which includes geography and environmental studies, so that they can work together. According to Lee, smaller units don’t have the same resource and staffing advantages as a larger group under the supervision of a director who has more time to oversee the entire unit.

read more here for the official article.