Author Archive | amrita

New Resource Sheet on Mental Health

A resource sheet featuring Canadian Mental Health Resources is now available on the Centre’s website! This summary sheet provides a list of the organizations that offer mental health resources and links for further information.

To see the resource sheet click here.

Raising Awareness about Youth Suicide—Making the Connection

“E” Division RCMP Crime Prevention Services is holding a Youth Mental Health workshop that encourages collaboration and diverse stakeholders to share their knowledge and experiences. Discussion topics for this event include: landscape for children and youth, how to effectively support young people, and learning how technology is playing a role in youth mental health. There are two separate workshops being provided; one in the Lower Mainland, and one in Prince George.

For more information about the event details for the Lower Mainland click here 

For more information about the event details for the Prince George click here

 

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS – Crisis Centre’s ‘Building Healthy Communities’ – supported by the Vancouver Canucks Alumni

 The Steve Cowan Scholarship for Leadership in Action has been created to recognize and support individuals who have made a positive contribution to their school and/or local community through their leadership. If you are a youth living in the Lower Mainland or in the Sea-to-Sky Corridor who has made a difference in your community, the Crisis Centre wants to hear from you. Please read the following eligibility and guidelines, along with the application:

The Steve Cowan Scholarship for Leadership in Action Application Package

 The Rick Blight Leadership in Action Scholarship for Athletes: if you are an athlete living in the Lower Mainland or in the Sea-to-Sky Corridor who is passionate about leadership and has made efforts to support your personal health and wellness or that of your sports team or community, we want to hear from you. Please read the following eligibility and guidelines, along with the application

The Rick Blight Leadership in Action Scholarship for Athletes Application Package

Check out the Crisis Centre’s website for more detailed information, including last year’s winners: http://crisiscentre.bc.ca/about-us/scholarship/

 

 

Social Media Resources in Education

Find a collection of blogs, articles, and videos from to help teachers engage students through social media tools in the classroom as part of in 21st-century learning by clicking here. Along with items for professional development, creating social media guidelines, you will also find digital citizenship and online safety resources.

 

Training on the Youth Criminal Justice Act

Training on the Youth Criminal Justice Act

Are you interested in learning more about Canada’s Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA)? A new online tool has been developed with the goal of educating the public on matters concerning the YCJA. There are many learning options available for youth, teachers, and criminal justice professionals throughout the website that help create a better understanding of the legislation.

For more information about the YCJA training, click here.

The Crisis Centre’s Community Education department offers complementary suicide prevention training programs

The Crisis Centre will again be offering a safeTALK workshop on Wednesday January 22nd from 9am-12:30pm or Saturday February 22nd from 12:30pm – 4:00pm. These programs include:

  • safeTALK is a half day training suitable for anyone wanting to help; minimum age 15 years.   The training prepares participants to identify persons with thoughts of suicide and connect them to suicide first aid resources.
  • ASIST is a two-day intensive training that prepares participants to be able to provide suicide first aid intervention.

For more information, click here.

February 26th, 2014 is Pink Shirt Day!

This February, 26th, 2014, wear pink to draw attention to the importance of supportive relationships! Remind others about the story behind Pink Shirt Day to inspire others to become courageous in the face of injustice. Reflect on the actions that two brave Nova Scotia students took in protest against the harassment that was happening to a grade 9 boy because he was wearing a pink shirt to school. Since handing out pink t-shirts to all the boys in their school in 2007, Pink Shirt Day has been observed every year in February and now observed worldwide.

For more information on Pink Shirt Day, click here.

More information about why you should stand up to bullying is available on the following fact sheets:

Bullying

Bullying: Relational Aggression Among University Students

Disabilities and Vulnerability to Bullying

Homophobia

 

 

DIVERSITY not adversity

All children and adults are diverse! Diversity does not simply refer to race, ethnicity, language, special needs, or sexual orientation. While it may include these qualities, it’s much broader. For example, we may be different from each other because of our age, how our families are arranged, our body shape, whether we’re rich or poor, the language(s) we speak, where we live, or our learning style. Everyone has rights and should be treated with respect regardless of their perceived difference. Respecting diversity entails being inclusive.

How can we become more inclusive in our daily lives? According to 11 year old Kellen Schleyer who has cerebral palsy and attends Ottawa’s St. Jerome Elementary School, “sometimes mom[s] and dad[s] try to hide [my disability] so it doesn’t make me feel bad, but I don’t mind if they ask the questions. I’m just a normal kid but in this [wheel]chair.” Child-Life specialist, Nora Ullyot says these are subjects that we should discuss with our children. Rather than saying, “They can’t do things, encourage children to see how children with physical challenges do things differently, or that their body works differently.”

For those hoping to build more inclusive schools and communities, it is important to begin by carefully listening to understand how people define their own situation, their aspirations and assets, and the challenges they face. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child refers to the importance of respecting diversity throughout its articles. For example, a child friendly language version of Article 2 states that:

All children [under 18 years of age] have these rights, no matter who they are,
where they live, what their parents do, what language they speak, what their religion is,
whether they are a boy or girl, what their culture is, whether they have a disability,
whether they are rich or poor. No child should be treated unfairly on any basis.

More about the importance of respecting diversity and promoting inclusive communities can be found by reading the following fact sheets.

Barriers for New Immigrant Youth

Bullying

Bullying: Relational Aggression Among University Students

Disabilities and Vulnerability to Bullying

Homophobia

Restorative Practices in Schools and Communities